Foods you should surely avoid with Wine!!!

1. Artichokes:

This vegetable contains a compound, called cynarine, that messes with the taste of your wine. As Bon Appétit explains, cynarine “makes everything taste sweeter than it actually is because it knocks out your taste receptors and inhibits you from experiencing acidity, bitterness, and saltiness. This leaves wine, yes, tasting sweeter, but also flat and one-note because the cynarine has robbed you of the wine’s other characteristics.”

2. Asparagus:

You may heard that asparagus just doesn’t pair well with wine. But chances are good that you don’t know why. As Wine Folly explains, there are two compounds at fault. The first are the sulfurous compounds in asparagus, which can actually mimic the taste of a wine fault. The second is the green, herbaceous flavor introduced by the high levels of chlorophyl in the vegetable. You’d be hard-pressed to find a wine that pairs well with asparagus, so you might want to choose a different drink to serve. 

3. Blue cheese:

This is most likely because the blue cheese has a high presence of a particularly odiferous aroma compound called alkan-2-ones which is also found in sphagnum swamp moss. Sounds appetizing, doesn’t it?  Blue cheese typically overpowers most of the wines that go well with cheese. So you’ll probably want to avoid this pairing. This is most likely because the blue cheese has a high presence of a particularly odiferous aroma compound called alkan-2-ones which is also found in sphagnum swamp moss.” Sounds appetizing, doesn’t it?  Blue cheese typically overpowers most of the wines that go well with cheese. So you’ll probably want to avoid this pairing. 

4. Brussels sprouts:

The earthy and sulfurous flavors of this cruciferous vegetable pose some major challenges that even the best sommeliers can’t surmount. In fact, Brussels sprouts almost always make wine taste bad because of the vegetable’s organosulfur compounds. These compounds — also found at varying levels in asparagus, broccoli, cauliflower, and garlic — mimic the taste of a wine fault. Unless you go with very specific wines, you should pick a different beverage to serve with your Brussels sprouts. 

5. Chocolate:

Tasting chocolate adds a few sensations to your palate including textured chocolate tannin, fattiness, sweetness and an earthy flavor. When you finish this taste with a dry red wine, the wine scrapes the fattiness and sweetness from your palate leaving harsh tannins and a sour note of wine. Even worse? The wine’s more subtle flavors get lost thanks to the chocolate. There may be a few rare pairings that can make it work. But in most cases, you should enjoy chocolate and wine separately, not together. 

Artichokes
Asparagus
Blue Cheese
Brussels Sprouts
Chocolate

#Health Food Fonts

Published by Food Fonts

A passionate informative blogger, In need of your love ND support ♥️♥️

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